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Park Hill Primary

Computing

 

Whole School Progression Framework click here

National Curriculum Programme of Study click here

The National Curriculum Strands click here

Computing Cultural Capital click here

Park Hill Primary School
Computing Curriculum Statement

Intent

 

Our aim is to give children a thorough and ambitious education in computing, equipping them to use technology, computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. It is now more important than ever that children understand how to use technology positively, responsibly and safely, and that they see good models of this.

Children will have gained key knowledge and skills in the three main strands of the National Curriculum for Computing (2014). These strands are: computer science (programming and understanding how digital systems work), information technology (using computer systems to create, store, retrieve and send information) and digital literacy (evaluating digital content and using technology safely and respectfully).

Our knowledge-engaged curriculum enables children to understand how computers and computer systems (such as the internet) work, and how they are designed and programmed. It ensures they know what to do if they have concerns about anything they encounter online, and how to be safe, responsible and respectful when using the internet. Equally, the curriculum provides many opportunities for learners to apply their evolving knowledge imaginatively, becoming fluent and creative in their mastery of computing. The depth and breadth of coverage aims to provide all our children with a solid grounding for future learning and the ability to become active digital citizens in the modern world.

 

Implementation

 

At Park Hill, computing is taught once per week over each half term. Teachers use specified units from the updated ‘Switched On Computing scheme V3, published by Rising Stars, as a starting point for the planning of their computing lessons. The key knowledge and skills that must be taught within each unit have been identified and carefully mapped to support the progression of children’s learning across the primary phases, building towards the end of key stage objectives from the National Curriculum. Freedom for teachers to develop and adapt computing units within the framework of the progression map leads to rich links with engaging contexts in other subjects and topics, while still ensuring systematic coverage of objectives. An overview of each unit’s key vocabulary, key knowledge and linked prior knowledge is shared with children before each computing block begins.  After completing a unit, learners complete a brief key knowledge quiz to assess their retention and understanding of core facts and concepts. They also self-assess their confidence in the skills practised throughout the project.

The implementation of our new progression framework in computing ensures a balanced coverage of the three computing strands (computer science, information technology and digital literacy). The children work on all three strands each year. As they progress through the school, children build on their prior learning within each strand, covering new or deeper knowledge and developing their technical skills. The relevant, context-embedded computing experiences through which this knowledge-engaged curriculum is taught will benefit learners in secondary school, further education and future workplaces. From research methods, use of presentation and creative tools and computational and critical thinking, computing at Park Hill School gives children the building blocks that enable them to pursue a wide range of interests and vocations in the next stage of their lives.

 

Our approach to the curriculum provides fun, engaging and meaningful learning for all pupils, in which the children understand not only the content that is taught but the opportunities offered to them by their computing education, enabling them to become creators and change-makers in our digital world. The impact of the curriculum and the quality of children’s learning is evident in their work, which is shared, published and celebrated on Twitter (an online platform). Fortnightly monitoring of these outcomes, alongside key knowledge quiz results and interviews with teachers and learners, allows the subject lead to ensure the knowledge-engaged curriculum taught is being learned and retained by all pupils. All this information also feeds into teachers’ future planning and enables assessment of pupil’s knowledge and skills. Through cross-curricular uses of computing in other subjects, teachers are able to revisit misconceptions and knowledge gaps in computing in tandem with other curriculum areas. This supports varied paces of learning and ensures all pupils make good progress.

 

Impact

 

Evidence for the impact of the computing curriculum at Park Hill is gathered in the following ways:

 

  • Teacher assessment data indicating whether pupils have not met, met or exceeded each objective within a unit
  • Feedback from pupil conferencing
  • Evaluation of work folders (physical and digital) kept by teachers
  • Teacher skills audits
  • Staff feedback gathered during staff meetings.

 

The key indicators of impact in the computing curriculum at Park Hill are:

 

  • Teacher assessment data show that a majority of pupils meet the expectations of the curriculum
  • Pupils show a positive attitude towards computing and actively engage with learning
  • Pupils understand, use and retain the correct technical vocabulary necessary for computing
  • The children’s work demonstrates understanding and application of knowledge
  • Pupils have a secure understanding of the benefits and risks of associated with a broad range of digital technology
  • Pupils transition to secondary school with a keen interest in the continuation of learning in this subject.

 

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development

Spiritual: The opportunity to explore beliefs, experience and faiths, feelings and values; enjoy learning about oneself, others and the surrounding world; use imagination and creativity and reflect on experiences. In Computing, pupils can explore all of these in a positive learning environment with a greater understanding of the world around them.

Moral: The opportunity to learn what is right and wrong and respect the law; understand consequences; investigate moral and ethical issues and offer reasoned views. Through online safety lessons as well as embedded moral ideals through taught units, pupils are supported with the very highest safety curriculum.

Social: The opportunity to use a range of social skills to participate in the local community and beyond; appreciate diverse viewpoints; participate, volunteer and cooperate; resolve conflict. Developing social skills is modelled and pupils understand how to communicate their ideas in a safe and confident manner. Problem solving skills and teamwork are embedded in the computing curriculum, through creative thinking, discussion, explaining and presenting ideas. Self and peer reviewing are very important to enable pupils to have an accurate grasp of where they are and how they need to improve. Working together in pairs or groups and supporting others is a key part of maths lessons. Pupils are always guided and instructed in valuing others’ opinions and ideas.

Cultural: The opportunity to explore and appreciate cultural influences; appreciate the role of Britain’s parliamentary system; participate in cultural opportunities; understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity. Computing allows pupils to make links with all aspects of cultural diversity and value systems.

Park Hill School Computing Scheme of Work 2023-2024

EYFS
Nursery

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Myself

Ourselves & our senses

Exploring colour

Journey

Changes (people & plants)

What is water used for?

1 We have confidence

2 We can take turns

3 We are successful

3 We are successful

5 We can drive

1 We have confidence

2 We can take turns

4 We have feelings

6 We are DJs

11 We can understand messages

16 We can count

7 We can exercise

9 We can listen

10 We can understand instructions

8 We are healthy

12 We are talkers

18 We are shape makers

8 we are healthy


Reception

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

Me and my family

Ourselves & our world

Colour

Making journeys

Changes (Life cycles)

Water in its different forms.

1 We have confidence

2   We can take turns

12 We are talkers

4 We have feelings

5 We can drive

3 We are successful

7  We can exercise

6  We are DJs

13 we are digital readers

8 We are healthy

11 We can understand  messages

21 We are games players

9  We can listen

14 We can email

18 We are shape makers

16 We can count

15 We can blog

23 We can record soundtracks

10  We can understand instructions

22 We are creative

19 we are community members

20 We can observe

17 We are designers

24 We are film producers

 

 COMPUTING LONG TERM OVERVIEW

2023 - 24

Computing Unit

Autumn 2023

Spring 2024

Summer 2024

EYFS

 30-50

To know how to operate simple equipment

To show and interest in technological toys

To show a skill in making toys work

To know information can be retrieved through computers

40-60

To complete a simple program
To interact with age appropriate computer software

ELG
To recognise a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools

To select and use technology

Year 1

 

 

 

1.1 We are treasure hunters

1.1 We are treasure hunters

 

 

1.2 We are TV chefs

1.2 We are TV chefs

 

 

1.3 We are digital artists

 

1.3 We are digital artists

 

1.4 We are publishers

 

1.4 We are publishers

 

1.5 We are rhythmic

 

 

1.5 We are rhythmic

1.6 We are detectives

 

 

1.6 We are detectives

 

 

 

 

Year 2

 

 

 

2.1 We are astronauts

2.1 We are astronauts

 

 

2.2 We are games testers

2.2 We are games testers

 

 

2.3 We are photographers

 

2.3 We are photographers

 

2.4 We are safe researchers

 

2.4 We are safe researchers

 

2.5 We are animators

 

 

2.5 We are animators

2.6 We are zoologists

 

 

2.6 We are zoologists

 

 

 

 

Year 3

 

 

 

3.1 We are programmers

3.1 We are programmers

 

 

3.2 We are bug fixers

3.2 We are bug fixers

 

 

3.3. We are presenters

 

3.3. We are presenters

 

3.4 We are who we are

 

3.4 We are who we are

 

3.5 We are co-authors

 

 

3.5 We are co-authors

3.6 We are opinion pollsters

 

 

3.6 We are opinion pollsters

 

 

 

 

Year 4

 

 

 

4.1 We are software developers

4.1 We are software developers

 

 

4.2 We are makers

4.2 We are makers

 

 

4.3 We are musicians

 

4.3 We are musicians

 

4.4 We are bloggers

 

4.4 We are bloggers

 

4.5 We are artists

 

 

4.5 We are artists

4.6 We are meteorologists

 

 

4.6 We are meteorologists

 

 

 

 

Year 5

 

 

 

5.1 We are games developers

5.1 We are games developers

 

 

5.2 We are cryptographers

5.2 We are cryptographers

 

 

5.3 We are architects

 

5.3 We are architects

 

5.4 We are web designers

 

5.4 We are web designers

 

5.5 We are adventure gamers

 

 

5.5 We are adventure gamers

5.6 We are VR designers

 

 

5.6 We are VR designers

 

 

 

 

Year 6

 

 

 

6.1 We are toy makers

6.1 We are toy makers

 

 

6.2 We are computational thinkers

6.2 We are computational thinkers

 

 

6.3 We are publishers

 

6.3 We are publishers

 

6.4 We are connected

 

6.4 We are connected

 

6.5 We are advertisers

 

 

6.5 We are advertisers

6.6 We are AI developers

 

 

6.6 We are AI developers